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MeDVARSITY, UNSW collaborate to run health e-course

Hyderabad, December 12: MeDVARSITY, an e-learning initiative from healthcare major Apollo Hospitals Group and Australia's University of New South Wales (UNSW) today announced to collaborate in the healthcare e-learning space.

As part of the collaboration, MeDVARSITY will launch its first course on infectious disease management next month, aimed at doctors, nurses and health professionals. Under the one-year diploma, syllabus will cover topics such as surveillance of infectious diseases, pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, vaccines and current challenges in infectious diseases control, Apollo Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Dean, Dr Dilip Mathai told reporters here.

"India faces several challenges in the management of emerging and endemic infectious diseases and there is a great need to enhance the number of trained clinicians in this space," UNSW's School of Public Health Head Prof Raina McIntyre said. "UNSW and Apollo Knowledge team have worked together to develop the curriculum," UNSW's Dean of Medicine Prof Peter Smith said.

MeDVARSITY UNSW collaborate to run health e-course

Apollo Hospitals Group Joint Managing Director Sangita Reddy said there is an alarming emergence of infectious diseases and it is of paramount importance for the healthcare industry stakeholders to join hands and ensure that there are enough doctors skilled to deal with the situation. "MeDVARSITY and UNSW will continue to work together on multiple opportunities in future too," she added.

PG Diploma in Infectious Diseases is a one-year online course which includes a five-day optional contact programme, designed for clinicians with an interest in management and control of infectious diseases, who would like to improve their skills and enhance their knowledge to support implementation of infectious disease programmes. Infectious disease remain one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality globally and diseases like measles, malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS continue to remain leading causes of death across the world, they said.

PTI

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