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LSAT-India 2013 Test Pattern and Scoring

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LSAT-India 2013 Test Pattern and Scoring
Law School Admission Test - India is a standardized test adopted as an admissions criterion by multiple law colleges across India. LSAT-India measures skills that are considered essential for success in law school. LSAT-India is specially created for admissions to law schools in India by the Law School Admission Council, USA (LSAC).

LSAT-India 2013 entrance exam is conducted for admission to the B.A LL.B , LL.B and LL.M degree programmes across the country.

LSAT-India 2013 Online Registration Form

Reference Books And Sample Papers For LSAT

Pattern Details:

Section: No of Questions: Timings:
Analytical Reasoning Approx. 24 35 Minutes
1st Logical Reasoning
Approx. 24 35 Minutes  
2nd Logical Reasoning
Approx. 24 35 Minutes 
Reading Comprehension
Approx. 24  35 Minutes  
Total: 4 Sections
92-100 Questions
2 Hours 20 Minutes

The sections on the LSAT-India may appear in any order but always consist of one Analytical Reasoning section, one Reading Comprehension section, and two Logical Reasoning sections. The LSAT-India is a paper-and-pencil test. All questions are in a multiple-choice format, some with four answer choices and others with five (all questions in the 2013 exam will have five answer choices). Answers are collected on a scannable answer sheet.

Analytical Reasoning Questions:
These questions measure the ability to understand a structure of relationships and to draw logical conclusions about that structure. The test taker is asked to reason deductively from a set of statements and rules or principles that describe relationships among persons, things, or events. Analytical Reasoning questions reflect the kinds of complex analyses that a law student performs in the course of legal problem solving.

Logical Reasoning Questions:
These questions assess the ability to analyze, critically evaluate, and complete arguments as they occur in ordinary language. Each Logical Reasoning question requires the test taker to read and comprehend a short passage, then answer a question about it. The questions are designed to assess a wide range of skills involved in thinking critically, with an emphasis on skills that are central to legal reasoning. These skills include drawing well-supported conclusions, reasoning by analogy, determining how additional evidence affects an argument, applying principles or rules, and identifying argument flaws.

Reading Comprehension Questions:
These questions measure the ability to read, with understanding and insight, examples of lengthy and complex materials similar to those commonly encountered in law school. The Reading Comprehension section contains four sets of reading questions, each consisting of a selection of reading material, followed by four to eight questions that test reading and reasoning abilities.

Test Scoring for Undergraduate and Postgraduate Programmes:
Test scores are reported on a percentile basis, comparing each candidate's performance to that of the others within his or her candidate group (Five-Year Integrated LL.B. Programme or Two-Year LL.M./ Three-Year LL.B. Programme). Scores for one candidate group cannot be compared to those for the other candidate group since they are based on group performance. So, for example, an undergraduate candidate earning an LSAT-India score of 82.5 has performed better on the test than 82.5 percent of the total undergraduate candidate pool. This score does not indicate what the candidate's standing would be within the post-undergraduate candidate pool. Note also that this score does not mean that the candidate answered 82.5 percent of the LSAT-India questions correctly. Thus, LSAT-India scores tell law schools the relative strength of the critical-thinking skills measured by the test for each candidate in comparison to the others in his or her candidate pool.

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